Thursday, April 2, 2015

Facebook Nixes Christian Advertising

From here:

i am

A week after Facebook bent to pressure over a “I’m feeling fat” emoticon that was apparently too offensive to the weight-challenged, the social media giant has proven that some groups are not as protected as others. Christians, for instance.

The site, which accepts ads for just about anything under the sun, has refused a fundraising advertisement for a film called I Am a Christian. The film, set to star Stacey Dash and Kevin Sorbo, is currently running a campaign on and producers had hoped to use Facebook as a platform for promotion.

To that end, they devised an ad campaign challenging Christian Facebook users to change their profile pictures to their I Am A Christian photo for a week. “Stand up and declare, Yes, I am a Christian!” said the ad.

That was unacceptable to the powers-that-be at Facebook. “Your ad wasn’t approved because it doesn’t follow our language policies,” said a member of the ads team. “We’ve found that people dislike ads that directly address them or their personal characteristics such as religion.”

Shouldn’t it be a company’s right to produce an ad that people dislike? Are there any ads that people actually do like? I would think the list of acceptable ads would be rather small if that was the criteria. Certainly smaller than what is currently allowed on Facebook.

Let’s get serious here. The reason Facebook refused the ad has nothing to do with the specific phrasing the film’s producers used. It has everything to do with the fact that it’s for a Christian movie. And as we all know, there’s nothing less liberal than to be a Christian in 2015. That just doesn’t play with the progressives.

Obviously, Facebook has the right to determine which ads will and won’t appear on their website, even if their reasoning is suspect. Still, it’s important to point out that this site has an agenda. And it’s an agenda that is becoming increasingly obvious.

It wasn’t long ago when the thought of being a “persecuted Christian” in the United States was met with uproarious laughter. But that time has passed. The America of today is not the one of even five years ago. Things have changed. There has been a dramatic shift to the secular left. Christianity is incompatible with the views liberals hold so dear. It holds up a standard of living and it says, “Here, be more like this.” And in the era of disappearing personal responsibility, that’s not acceptable.
One of the most important verses in the Bible is “I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me.” All things. Overcome the most oppressive circumstances. Clear the highest hurdles. When you believe in a philosophy like that, what use do you have in a handout? Why would you ever need to vote for a politician who promises to keep the welfare flowing? Why, you can just go out and earn your own money! We can’t have that. We have to keep people dependent.

And moreover, to the concerns of Facebook, we have to keep people distracted.


The liberal criminal's favorite trope is the Argumentum tu Quoque critical thinking alibi excuse for their own crimes:

"It's not an evil crime because we (i.e: you) all do it, too! Whee!"

As if by merely comparing two or more unrelated wrongs, they could somehow magically make one or more of them into a right.

So to criminals, it's always imperative to slander and victim-blame everyone else as being just as bad as they are, and also to assert that everyone is a helpless victim, too.

So to have a perfect example of a sinless man as an example to strive for, totally destroys their #1 alibi excuse for their false right to remain irresponsibly wrong.

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